Thursday, 3 November 2011

Wednesday, 2 November 2011

CLASSROOM GAMES



Do you need ideas for occupying students during the last ten minutes of a busy day? Perhaps you want to reward kids at the end of a particularly productive day. These ten games are great for end-of-the-day fun. You can link many of them to classroom curricula too.

http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/field_day_games.shtml

THE EARTH



The Earth (2006)
This animation includes a sound track dealing with the following concepts:
  • History of the Earth
  • Earth's Internal Dynamics
  • The Material of the Earth 
  • Earth's External Dynamics 
  • Earth-Moon movements



THE WATER CYCLE





Animation dealing with the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, cloud, rain, trickling, return to the body of water)


View this animationhttp://www2.cslaval.qc.ca/cdp/UserFiles/File/previews/water_cycle.swf

TEST your knowledge: http://www.get2knowh2o.org/student/cycle-test.html

INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES



Industrial processes (2008 - revised 2010)
This animation includes a sound track dealing with the following concepts:
  • Metal forming
  • Machining
  • Forming plastics
  • Machining ligneous materials
  • Forming composite materials
  • Forming glass and ceramic
  • Indirect and direct assemblies
  • Heat treatments (to come)

7 billion people and you: What's your number?




The world's population hits seven billion in 2011. How do you fit in? Use our app to find out.
I'm the 4,026,296,062nd. And you?
 

Friday, 23 September 2011

WEBTASK ABOUT ANCIENT EGYPT


Lola Aceituno is the creator of a beautiful webtask very helpful to understand life in the Ancient Egypt.

We are going to use it at class in order to review before the exam.

Good luck!



http://sites.google.com/site/lolaceituno2/ancientegypt

Wednesday, 11 May 2011

IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH SINGING



Lyrics Gaps lets you choose a song and the language you want it sung in.
The site gives you the option of seeing/hearing the song in different modes — karaoke, beginner, intermediate, expert. Apart from karaoke mode, you’re then shown a YouTube video of the singer, along with the lyrics on the side including blanks (fill-in-the-gap).

Links:

Friday, 6 May 2011

THE VIRTUAL ARCHITECTURE PROJECT



The Williams College's VirtualArchitecture site offers virtual tours of Palazzo del Te, Sant Andrea Mantova Cathedral and Bernini's Sant Andrea Al Quirinale, among others.

The first prototype, the Palazzo del Te in Mantua, Italy, was created in 2002. Since then the project team has documented over one hundred sites and monuments throughout Europe and North America.
The collection of virtual tours is used as a teaching resource in the classroom by the Department of Art at Williams.

Actually only this virtual tours are available.

Palazzo del Te | Sant' Andrea Mantova | San Carlo Alle Quattro Fontane | Rott-am-Inn | Sant' Andrea Al Quirinale | Die Wies (Wieskirche) | Neresheim 

The virtual tours were created using digital SLR cameras (Canon EOS 1Ds MarkII, Canon EOS 20D, Nikon D1, Nikon D100). Video was shot with a digital video camera (Panasonic 24P). Panoramas were rendered with REALVIZ Stitcher.

http://web.williams.edu/art/architectureVR/index2.html

DO YOU NEED A MAP? THIS IS YOUR PLACE.



The Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection at the University of Texas is a general collection of more than 250,000 maps covering all areas of the world.

The Map Collection has major holdings of political, topographic and thematic maps of the world, continents, regions, countries, states and provinces.

Many of the maps are included in the online catalog, UTNetCAT.

More than 5,000 map images from the collection are also available online.

Tuesday, 19 April 2011

Learn Art with SmartHistory


SmartHistory is a free and open, not-for-profit, art history textbook illustrated with beautiful images and great videos.

The site smARThistory is a unique, growing resource that aims to be an enhancement, or even a replacement, for the traditional art history textbook.  It allows users to browse styles, artists, and themes in an easy to use interactive timeline.  Clicking on a work will bring up short podcasts lectures, flickr feeds and links to other resources related to the work.

I strongly recommend you this web in order to study art units.

http://www.smarthistory.org/

Tuesday, 22 February 2011

IMPROVE YOUR VOCABULARY!



Vocab Genii is a question game about English vocabulary. You have to guess the hidden word. You have two clues: the definition and the rearranged letters of the word.


It's amazing!

http://vocabgenii.com/

Friday, 18 February 2011

The Virtual Museum of Iraq


The Italian government funded the creation of The Virtual Museum of Iraq, showing pieces dating from the Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian eras and more.

Do you want to travel to Iraq?

Click here http://www.virtualmuseumiraq.cnr.it/homeENG.htm

Tuesday, 11 January 2011

ORIGIN OF THE NAMES OF THE DAYS

Days of the Roman Week
Roman Day
Rough Translation
Modern Day
Modern Source
Dies Saturni
Day of Saturn
Saturday
Direct passage from Latin
Dies Solis
Day of the Sun
Sunday
Direct passage from Latin
Dies Lunae
Day of the Moon
Monday
Direct passage from Latin
Dies Martis
Day of Mars
Tuesday
Originally Tiwesdaeg 'The day of Tiw',
from the Norse Tysdagr.
Dies Mercurii
Day of Mercury
Wednesday
Originally Wodnesdaeg 'the day of Woden' (Odin), from Norse Odinsdagr.
Dies Jovis
Day of Jupiter
Thursday
Originally Thursdaeg 'the day of Thor',
from Norse Thorsdagr.
Dies Veneris
Day of Venus
Friday
Originally Frigesdaeg 'the day of Freya',
from Norse Freyjasdagr.




Sunday
The name comes from the Latin dies solis, meaning "sun's day": the name of a pagan Roman holiday. It is also called Dominica (Latin), the Day of God..

French: dimanche; Italian: domenica; Spanish: domingo (from dominica)
German: Sonntag (from: sunday);

Monday
The name comes from the Anglo-Saxon monandaeg, "the moon's day". This second day was sacred to the goddess of the moon.

French: lundi; Italian: lunedi. Spanish: lunes. [from Luna, "Moon"]
German: Montag; Dutch: maandag. [from: 'moon-day']

Tuesday
This day was named after the Norse god Tyr. The Romans named this day after their war-god Marsdies Martis.

French: mardi; Italian: martedi; Spanish: martes.

Wednesday
The day named to honor Wodan (Odin).
The Romans called it dies Mercurii, after their god Mercury.

French: mercredi; Italian: mercoledi; Spanish: miércoles. (from Mercury)

Thursday
The day named after the Norse god Thor. In the Norse languages this day is called Torsdag.
The Romans named this day dies Jovis ("Jove's Day"), after Jove or Jupiter, their most important god.

French: jeudi; Italian: giovedi; Spanish: jueves. (from Jove)

Friday
The day in honor of the Norse goddess Frigg. 
To the Romans this day was sacred to the goddess Venus, and was known as dies veneris.

French: vendredi; Italian: venerdi; Spanish: viernes. (from Venus)

Saturday
This day was called dies Saturni, "Saturn's Day", by the ancient Romans in honor of Saturn. 

French: samedi; Italian: sabato; Spanish: sábado


¡LET'S PLAY!  The Roman Week 
How was the Roman week different from the one we use today? 
Find out with this simple matching exercise.

ORIGIN OF THE NAMES OF THE MONTHS




Only a few names of the month were derived from Roman deities. Most simply came from the numbers of the months or -- in two cases -- in honor of Roman emperors.

January: Named after the Roman god of beginnings and endings Janus (the month Januarius).

February: The name comes either from the old-Italian god Februus or else from februa, signifying the festivals of purification celebrated in Rome during this month.

March : This is the first month of the Roman year. It is named after the Roman god of war, Mars.

April: Called Aprilis, from aperire, "to open". Possible because it is the month in which the flowers begin to open.


May: The third month of the Roman calendar. The name probably comes from Maiesta, the Roman goddess of honor and reverence.

June: The fourth month was named in honor of Juno. However, the name might also come from iuniores (young men; juniors) as opposed to maiores (old men; majors) for May, the two months being dedicated to young and old men.

July: It was the month in which Julius Caesar was born, and named Julius in his honor in 44 BCE, the year of his assassination. Also called Quintilis (fifth month).


August: Originally this month was called Sextilis (from sextus, "six"), but the name was later changed in honor of the first of the Roman emperors, Augustus.

September: The name comes from septem, "seven".


October: The name comes from octo, "eight"


November The name comes from novem, "nine".


December: The name comes from decem, "ten".


LET'S PLAY! The Roman Calendar   Match each month with its origin.

BE A GLADIATOR


Dress a gladiator for battle in the Roman arena of death.
Your choice of weapons and armour will decide whether or not he is victorious.
Will the emperor grant your gladiator his freedom, or will he fight badly and lose his honour, or even his life?

LAUNCH THE GAME